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X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:_ 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

i fiilif iili'l fiiii I'li'iuISi M:: mil :i:ii ,':'■• " " 




020 534 932 7 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

inn iiiii iiiii inn inn mi iiii 




020 534 933 9 



Box N umber 



328/j 



Total of 

Volumes 



323 



3^6 



l&G 



Call Number 






ll}> 






.VUo 



r. 



INDEPENDENCE 



4 JAN 2 y 
Copy „W o 




National Historical Park 



Pennsylvania 









• U.V© 



' 



INDEPENDENCE 







? 



INDEPENDENCE 







■ 




THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE COOPERATING ^ ITH THE 
ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQUITIES 







f 




THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE COOPERATING Vt ITH THE 
ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQUITIES 



' 




THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE COOPERATING WITH THE 
ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA AM IQI ITIES 




-v;,^.. 



■ 



JEFFERSON 



NATIONAL 
EXPANSION 
MEMORIAL 

St. Louis, Missouri 




' 



*P3» 



JEFFERSON 



NATIONAL 
EXPANSION 
MEMORIAL 

St. Louis, Missouri 




tf?33-* 



JEFFERSON 



NATIONAL 
EXPANSION 
MEMORIAL 

St. Louis, Missouri 




' 



JOSHUA 
TREE 




' 




.US 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 

ALASKA 'tfgi 






' 


*^B0vB 


■'" 




' 



KATMAI 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 



X-ElbO 

.US 



ALASKA 



*$&. 




< 




t 



NATIONAL BATTLEFIELDx. E160 




r 




^TIORAt^p^ATfON AREA 
'*, Arizona »iNevada 



*m& 



dm 




■ I— •*»_*! 



LASSEN 




» _.» 







WARNING 

In hot springs or steaming areas STAY ON ESTAB- 
LISHED TRAILS AT ALL TIMES; keep small children 
under strict physical control to avoid burns and accidents. 
Safe-appearing ground crusts may be dangerously thin. 






f 



LASSEN 



N A. 



Mth PAR 

.116 California 






1$' j£fc 




WARNING 

In hot springs or steaming areas STAY ON ESTAB- 
LISHED TRAILS AT ALL TIMES; keep small children 
under strict physical control to avoid burns and accidents. 
Safe-appearing ground crusts may be dangerously thin. 



Mammoth Cave 

NATIONAL PARK • KENTUCKY 

(1 ff 

\-Jpen all near 

X-E160 

• U6 



r< 



? 









<J%.~- 




' 



Mammoth CaviT 

NATIONAL PARK • KENTUCKY 

















Mammoth Cave 2 

NATIONAL PARK • KENTUCKY 



\-Jpen all uear /A, 

Y-E160 





' 





1*750 



NATIONAL PARK 

COLORADO 




' 



p 



Moores 



#p->J X-E160 
.U6 




NATIONAL MILITARY P'ARI^fe 




f 



ft 



Moores Creek 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 

X-E160 





ir?£3 



t 



Moores Cree 






-6, 



*, 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK' 




~m 



t 



ft 



Moores 



*15H 




NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



ttT2 31958 
1 Ccpy .. 





NATIONAL PARK 



Alaska 




■ 




NATIONAL PARK 



Alaska 




//f^/la^/ 




TIONAL PARK 

Washington 




' 



4f +T2>Z B 



NATIONAL PARK 



Washington 
X-E160 




X-EJ60 
.U6 



MOUNT 
RUSHMORE 






#25? 




National Memorial 



SOUTH DAKOTA 




f 



NATURAL BRIDGES 

National Monument 

UTAH 




f 




X-Bbu 

.U6 

QQTUi 

M2(e\ 



AVAJO 



S*^Sg& 




'# ** '.^l; 







X-E160 
.U6 



AVAJO 



ib & z 




o 



•• 




NATIONAL PARK 

Washington 



X-E160 








-. — 







.- 



- <■ - .. ■ - - 



' 




4 N0V21 
_. 1958 [ 

jo Mountain Drive 

ORGAN PIPE CACTUS 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 

ARIZONA 

X-E160 
.116 




■ 




er m 



"AND ,uo 



I 



ER PLANT 



PARKER-DAVIS PROJECT 




Bureau of Reclamation. W. A. Dexheimer, Commit«ioner 






I 






PETERSBURG 

National Military Park • Virginia 

ti?7c 




PETERSBURG 






National Military Park 



Xirg/nia 



4 
'Copy 



X-E160 



I \t 



1008 




t 



■fill* 

PETERSBURG 

National Military Park -* Virginia 

4 OCT 31 



Copy 



1358 



XE160 




*D~73 



Petrified Forest 



4 JUL J* 



NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZONA 

X-E160 
.116 



i^^^^V*****!^ 



^■**vUi* 




The Removal of Petrified Wood from the Monument is Prohibited by Law 



2JTL*.\ 




W&3S8 



msm 




PINNACLES 



AW 



National Monuiiien 




> 



PINNACLES 



tins 



National Monument 




PINNACLES 



National Monumen 





C A L I F O R 



' 



PINNACLES 



tf?77 



A. JAN ^ 1 
Codv 1959 




National Monument 




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MINNESOTA 




NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD PARK • VIRGINIA 



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rprn 
iDLi 



r\ 



-\JLVq 




^Jfeo 



■ 









• . - 



<■ • 




NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD PARK • VIRGINIA 



I 







NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD PARK • VIRGINIA 



'. 




X-EI60 



? 





#283 



IONAL HISTORICAL PARK 

New York 



4 JUl 



f 



NATIONAL PARK 



VIRGINIA 

.1)6 




' 



Theodore Rooseveft 

X-E160 



* 



.u 
NATIONAL MEMORIAL PARK 





NORTH DAKOTA 












- 1958 — : -tOQth Anniversary of'Theodore Roosevelt's Birth 






#2 8k 

Theodore Roosevelt 



* 










A 



NATIONAL MEMORIAL PftftJieo 

.U6 

NORTH DAKOTA 




i \ 











TU2IGOOT 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 
ARIZONA 



#287 







»* 



V 










t 



TUZIGOOT 



mm 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



ARIZONA 



XE160 
.U6 



y^sr- 



■Ci/* - 



&&: 



*&"•<■ 




\ _- 



(• 



TU21GOOT 



^i 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 

ARIZONA X~El((C> 




XEI60 
■ U6 



' 



Vanderbik 
Mansion 



NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 








' 



Vanderbilt 
Mansion 



NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



X-E260 

.ve 




' 



Vanderbilt 
Mansion 



X-^Vet> 



>» 

"5Z*, 







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4 ?ec ts 



in 



■- 






NATIONAL 



XE160 
.U6 



ARK 



#m 



& : • 



V w " 






- ^^ifck!» .**.■ "v 












•- 




« 
• 



^/■JiJ 



> ST. JOHN ISLAND, V. I. 



» ii 



9,%** 



■I igg^HgM^ggigMMg. ^ 



U6 

#2-95 

Walnut Canyon 




t 






Walnut Canyon 



4Mb 




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ATIO N 




FOR YOUR SAFETY 



While in geyser or hot springs areas, Stay on Con- 
structed Walks and Keep Your Children on Them. 
A fall into a boiling pool is fatal; in many places, ground 
crust that looks safe and solid is thin— dangerous to 
walk on. . .. 

Bears, Deer, and Other Large Animals Are Potentially 
Very Dangerous. Observe Them From a Distance; Do 
Not Feed Them. 










jf* 



10 ^ 



YELLOWSTONE 

NATIONAL PARK 

. f - Wyoming • Montana • Idaho 




,M*J** 




''&''- 



FOR YOUR SAFETY 



While in geyser or hot springs areas, Stay on Con- 
structed Walks and Keep Your Children on Them. 
A fail into a boiling pool is fatal; in many places, ground 
crust that looks safe and solid is thin— dangerous to 
walk on. 

Bears, Deer, and Other Large Animals Are Potentially 
Very Dangerous. Observe Them From a Distance; Do 
Not Feed Them. 






YELLOWSTONE 

NATIONAL PARK 

^ ■ "..-<■ Wyoming • Montana • Idaho 

















isSiMtf^ 



?■_ '•?!<»• •«- 



**?*■; 





FOR YOUR SAFETY 

While in geyser or hot springs areas, Stay on Con- 
structed Walks and Keep Your Children on Them. 
A fall into a boiling pool is fatal; in many places, ground 
crust that looks safe and solid is thin— dangerous to 
walk on. 

Bears, Deer, and Other Large Animals Are Potentially 
Very Dangerous. Observe Them From a Distance; Do 
Not Feed Them. 



pi iu> 



YELLOWSTONE 

NATIONAL PARK 



: Wyoming • Montana • Idaho 




FOR YOUR SAFETY 

While in geyser or hot springs areas, Stay on Con- 
structed Walks and Keep Your Children on Them. 
A fall into a boiling pool is fatal; in many places, ground 
crust that looks safe and solid is thin — dangerous to 
walk on. 

Bears, Deer, and Other Large Animals Are Potentially 
Very Dangerous. Observe Them From a Distance; Do 
Not Feed Them. 



X'£i60 



YOSEMITE 







HIlrilHIllHttil 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT 
OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



•-•:•■* 



7- 




Ufc 



CAMPING 3 *™ 




IN AREAS ADMINISTERED BY 
THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



t 




EN AREAS ADMINISTERED BY 
THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 






I MMa^ 



'. 



National Parks ^ a ^ 



and 



National Forests 



A Statement by 






THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

and 

THE FOREST SERVICE 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



Millions of people annually visit both Na- 
tional Parks and National Forests, or receive 
benefits of one kind or another from them, 
without realizing that there is a definite dis- 
tinction between these two kinds of Federal 
reservations. Perhaps you are one of these, and 
would like to know what that distinction is. 

Both the National Forests and the many kinds 
of areas that comprise the National Park System 
exemplify conservation — the wise use of our 
resources; and both play an important part in 
the lives of the people of our Nation. 






' 



NATURALIST PROGRiaH ^. 
Hount Rainier National Park 
Yakima Park and Chanapecosh 



is 



vtf 






Haturalist Service 
The park naturalists, by means or illustrated talks 
and guided field trips, endeavor to make the park visitors 
better acquainted with the natural features of hount 
Rainier National Park j its geology, forests, wildflowers, 
animals and history. The hikes are for comparatively 
short distances, one to three miles, and stops are made 
at frequent intervals at points of interest. All such 
guided trips are planned to be of not more than three 
hours duration. Hikers should wear sturdy, comfortable 
walking shoes. Hikes are not made in inclement weather, 
or when less than five persons attend. These trips and 
talks are offered without charge by the National Park 
Service, and afford an excellent opportunity for the 
visitor to increase his enjoyment of the area through 
a better understanding of the natural scene. 



'. 



■*> 



S Q.UI C 



<? 



■V 



ABRAHAM^'' 



4 MAR 9 1959 
1958 



LINCOLN^gfl 

NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK, KENTUCKY 




" Jil '"Pi 
The Boundary Oak. 
Near this famous landmark stood the cabin in which Lincoln was born. 



■' 



ABRAHAM' 
LINCOLN^ 

NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK, KENTUCKY 





The Boundary Oak. 

Near this famous landmark stood the cabin in which Lincoln was born. 



X-E160 
.U6 







ABRAHAivx % 
LINCOLN % ; ■ 

NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK, KENTUCKY 




The Boundary Oak. 

Near this famous landmark srood the cabin in which Lincoln was born. 



.♦««"«> 



■V 



ABRAHAM 
LINCOLN^ 



AXA© 



**u 







The Boundary Oak. 

Near this famous landmark stood the cabin in which Lincoln was born. 



f 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 



UTAH 



m 



■ 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 



UTAH 



1 



BLUE RIDGE 
PARKWAY 



VXVo 



ten 




•MM 




m 



> 



BLUE RIDGE 
PARKWAY 



$i\Z 




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NATIONAL PARK • UTAH 



:-.-V,T.;f4? 



fABRILLO 

V^> NATIONAL MON 



AXvo 



vi 



' 






> 



».. 







CALIFORNIA 



' 



X^\Wt) 



Capulin^ 



Mount 



am 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



4- JUN2 5 



y=B^===i§§L 




NEW MEXICO 



' 









mo 

NATIONAL HISTORICAL 
PARK & & LOUISIANA 





'. 




Qhalmetu 




n7\ 



NATIONAL HISTORICAL 
PARK iz -k LOUISIANA 




■ 



Qhalmette 




\ 



NATIONAL HISTORICAL 
PARK & it LOUISIANA 




CHIMNEY ROCK 



, 



NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



<ffe£ 



. *•- ■ 




*^lK 



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M 








. 






CHIMNEY ROCK 



NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 







' 







Dam 



NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 
WASHINGTON 



2E2r#s* 







Coulee 
Dam 



NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 
WASHINGTON 



4 OCT 19 1959 
| Copy •«; 





> 



■ 






(SU&Q13S1RIL&S9IS) 




&SP 



-H3CZ" 



National Historical Park 



KENTUCKY • VIRGINIA • TENNESSEE 







(gUJMlBllSBIL^M® 





*328 



National Historical Park 



KENTUCKY • VIRGINIA • TENNESSEE 4 APR 3 







r 



CUSTER BATTLEFIELD 

NATIONAL MONUMENT • MONTANA 




*M9 



4- JUN2 5 
Copy 1959 






B Stfttman, •*■■ 


m 







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CUSTER BATTLEFIELD 

NATIONAL MONUMENT • MONTANA 




3 




* 



A - 




TO%7 McHENXy T£7LqS77LTT 



The American flag is flown night and day over 
Fort McHenry from a flagstaff similar to that 
which stood on the same site in 1814, during 
the Battle of Baltimore. On the reconstructed 
staff, the first official 49-star flag, marking 
the admission of Alaska to the Union, was raised 
at 12:01a.m., July 4, 1959. From this staff, 
too, flies on special occasions a replica of the 
great 15-star flagwhich inspired Francis Scott 
Key to write the immortal words of The Star- 
Spangled Banner. The tattered remnants of the 
original flag are in the National Museum in 
Washington. 

The reconstructed flagstaff and its location 
within the fort conform to evidence uncovered 
by a special National Park Service historical 
and archeological research project in 1957-58. 
It was built by the United States Flagpole & 
Equipment Company of Marlboro, N. Y. , with funds 
donated by the Community Trust Company, New York 
City. It differs from the original mainly in 
that it is of laminated fir instead of solid 
pine spars, has lightning rod protection, and 
has a few important parts made of steel rather 
than of more perishable wood as in the original. 



*-*T #sa 







THE 



Franklin D. Roosevelt Library 



HYDE PARK, NEW YORK 



I 




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ENERAL GRA 



ATIONAL M E MORTAL 




% 







GENERAL GRANT ■***• 
NATIONAL MEMORIAL 




NEW YORK CITY 



' 



GENERAL GRANT ^ 
NATIONAL MEMORIAL * J3? 





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NEW YORK CITY 



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NATIONAL MILITARY PARK • Pennsylvania 



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WARNING 

In hot springs or steaming areas STAY ON ESTAB- 
LISHED TRAILS AT ALL TIMES; keep small children 
under strict physical control to avoid burns and accidents. 
Safe-appearing ground crusts may be dangerously thin. 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 




California 




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THE TRAIL OF THE SHADOWS 

A SELF GUIDES NATURE TRAIL FOR YOUR ENJOYMENT 

Along the trail will be found numbered markers. 
This leaflet describes the feature indicated by- 
each marker. 

Mount Ruinier National Park 

1* There are several mineral . springs around the meadow. 
Water temperatures range from warm to cold. The Soda 
Springs water is good to drink. 

2. The old Longmire Hotel, a log structure, was built 
on this site in 1890. Mineral baths and overnight 
accomriodations were furnished to the early day visitors. 

3. On this dry slope grows the Lodgepole Pine. The 
parent tree, now fallen, was 109 years old in 1950. 
This pine may be recognized by the two needles in a 
bundle. 

U» One of the largest trees in the park is the Douglas 
fir found in the lower valleys. The needles are very- 
flexible and the branches are drooping. The cone with 
its three pointed branch does not break up in the fall. 
It is not a true fir in spite of its name. 

5. The .Western Red Cedar is a common tree of the lower 
valleys. It has overlapping scale like leaves, and 
drooping fern like branches. The cones are small and 
oblong. The Alaska Yellow Cedar found commonly at 
higher elevations is a close relative. Neither of them 
are true cedars • . ' 



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TSlatchez^ 

PARKWAY 



TENNESSEE . ALABAMA . MISSISSIPPI 







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PARKWAY 

TENNESSEE . ALABAMA . MISSISSIPPI 




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Waitin^ton 

\ MAR 9 1959 




Oregon Caves % 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



OREGON 



4 FEB 2 












Caves 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 




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National Military Park 



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4- NOV 24 
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NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZONA 




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The Removal of Petrified Wood from the Monument is Prohibited by L 




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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Pinnacles National Monument 



.VJLVo 



*I37£ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 

Or you may use 

free of charge 

returning to box 



j CAVES AND MOSES SPRING NATURE TRAIL I 



p'HIS LEAFLET was prepared to help bring you more 
enjoyment of the park. Numbers in it corre- 
spond to those on markers along the loop trail. 



TRIP TBiE: 1 hour - 



DISTANCE: 1 mile 



A LTHOUGH T3E story of Pinnacles reaches 30 mil- 
/■^ lion years into the past to an era of explod- 
7 'ing volcanoes* the period that followed produc- 
ed the features that today make this. an area of out- 
standing scenic values. With almost imperceptible 
change through the centuries the 8000-foot volcanic 
peak has been eroded until only the western flank 
now remains* Tne old lavas, now support vegetation, 
which, in turn,' provides food and shelter for a host 
of birds and other wildlife. 



-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0 -0- 

J California Buckeye..- The large, showy fruit, 
maturing in the late. Fall, is not recommended 
for eating although the squirrels enjoy them. 

It is a vigorous plant, but it gets much unnec- 
essary sympathy as the leaves .fall in the Summer 
leaving the tree prematurely bare and apparently 
dead. 






' 



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4- AUG- 6 

i 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Pinnacles National Monument 









#177 



PRICE 10 CENTS 

Or you may use 

free of charge 

returning to box 



CAVES AND MOSES SPRING NATURE TRAIL 



HIS LEAFLET was prepared to help bring you more 
enjoyment of the park. Numbers in it corre- 
spond to those on markers along the loop trail. 

TRIP TIKE* 1 hour — DISTANCE: 1 mile 



ALTHOUGH THE story of Pinnacles reaches 30 mil- 
lion years into the past to an era of explod- 
/ ling volcanoes, the period that followed produc- 
ed the features that today make this an are'a of out- 
standing scenic values. With almost imperceptible 
change through the centuries the 8000-foot Volcanic 
peak has been eroded until only the western flank 
now remains. Tne old lavas now support vegetation, 
which, in turn, provides food and shelter for a host 
of birds and other wildlife. 



-. 0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0- 

California Buckeye . The large, showy fruit, 
/ maturing in the late Fall, is not recommended 
JL for eating although the squirrels enjoy them. 

It is a vigorous plant, but it gets much unnec- 
essary sympathy as the leaves fall in the Summer 
leaving the tree prematurely bare and apparently 
dead. 






NATIO 







Oklahoma 




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MOUNTAIN 

NATIONAL PARK 
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New York 





NATIONAL PARKS 



CALIFORNIA 



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COLORADO 




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NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 
LIBERTY ISLAND 
NEW YORK 









Welcome at 




DAMS • STEAM PLANTS 




Built for the people of the United States 



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THEODORE ROOSEVELT 

NATIONAL MEMORIAL PARK 



4- OCT 2 2 







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THEODORE ROOSEVELT 

NATIONAL MEMORIAL PARK 




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4 OCT 19 1959 

Copy 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZONA 




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CHRISTIANSTED ♦ ST. CROIX ♦ VIRGIN ISLANDS 



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CHRISTIANSTED ♦ ST. CROIX ♦ VIRGIN ISLANDS 



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NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 




CHRISTIANSTED ♦ ST. CROIX ♦ VIRGIN ISLANDS 



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4- JUN2 5 
Copy _2_ 1959 




WASHINGTON 




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National Monument 



WASHINGTON 







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Wright Brothers 

NATIONAL MEMORIAL 

NORTH CAROLINA 





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YELLOWSTONE 

NATIONAL PARK 

Wyoming U Montana • iJaho HHO^L 

4 OCT 19 1959 
j Copy ,? : 




FOR YOUR SAFETY 

WhiJe in geyser or hot springs areas, Stay on Constructed 
Walks and Keep Your Children on Them. A fall into a 
boiling pool is fatal; in many places, ground crust that 
looks safe and solid is thin — dangerous to walk on. 

Bears, Deer, and Other Large Animals Are Potentially 
Very Dangerous. Observe Them From a Distance; Do 
Not Feed them. Remain in Car. Keep Car Windows and 
Doors Closed When Stopping To Observe Bears. 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



tin 03 



Yosemite National Park 




CALIFORNIA 



The National Park System, of which this park is a unit, is dedi- 
cated to conserving the scenic, scientific, and historic heritage of 
the United States for the benefit and enjoyment of its people. 







UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Fred A. Scaron, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Conrad L. Wirth, Director 




GENERAL FEATURES. Yosemite National Park comprises 1,189 
square miles of mountain scenery and wilderness— deep canyons, tow- 
ering granite cliffs, majestic forests, verdant meadows, rugged alpine 
peaks, more than 200 sparkling lakes, small glaciers, and a great 
variety of plant and animal life. The high mountain country beyond 
Yosemite Valley makes up most of the park, but is accessible only 
in summer and early autumn and largely by trail. Detailed informa- 
rion and larger maps available at the museum and park headquarters 
at Yosemite Village Visitor Center and at park ranger stations. 

YOSEMITE VALLEY. A magnificent gorge of particular charm 
because of its nearly vertical, high sculptured walls; broad, flat floor; 
and lush meadows. The valley, at 4,000 feet elevation, is 7 miles long, 
about 1 mile wide, and 3,000 feet deep. It was cut by the combined 
action of the Merced River and the glaciers of the Ice Age. Visit the 
Yosemite Museum to learn this interesting story. 

Scenic features in Yosemite Valley: El Capitan (largest single rock), 
Three Brothers, Cathedral Rocks, Cathedral Spires, Sentinel Rock, 
Glacier Point Cliff, Royal Arches, North Dome, Mitror Lake, Half 
Dome (highest cliff rising from valley), Happy Isles, and the water- 
falls. See map on reverse side for other poinrs of interest, heights 
of cliffs and waterfalls, and roads and ttails in vicinity of valley. 

WATERFALLS. Yosemite Falls plunges 2,425 feet, in 3 falls, from 
its brink to the valley floor. The Upper Yosemire Fall, second highesr 
known free leap of water, drops 1,430 feet, equal to the height of 9 
Niagaras. Bridalveil Fall (620 feer) guards the western entrance to 
the valley. Vernal Fall (317 feet) and Nevada Fall (594 feet) have 
the greatest volume of water and can be seen from Glacier Point or 
by shorr trail trip from the valley. The falls are spectacular from 
mid- March to mid-July when most of the snow melts in the high 
Sierra, but they reach their maximum flow in May- and- June; During 
the rest of the year they arc small by comparison and are sometimes 
dry. 

MUSEUM AND NATURALIST ACTIVITIES. Exhibits in the 
museum at Yosemite Village will help you understand the plant and 
animal life, history, Indians, geology, and other natural features of the 
park. Park naturalists give daily talks on the valley fotmation and 
offer a variety of talks, guided trips, and campfire programs during 
the summer. Other exhibits of interest to both children and adults 
will be found at Happy Isles Nature Center, the meeting place for 
rhe Junior Ranger Program. Old buildings, wagons, and other ex- 
hibits at Wawona Pioneer Village tell the story of Yosemite's human 
history. 

HIKING. Obtain information about trails before hiking. Stay on 
designated trails; do not take shortcuts, or cut across zigzags— you 
might dislodge rocks that would injure others. On long hikes, start 
eatly, when it is cool, and get back before datk. Hikers going into 
isolated sections of the park should first register at a ranger sration. 

CAMPING. Free campgrounds in Yosemite Valley, at Glacier Point, 
Wawona, Tuolumne Meadows, and at several isolated spots. House- 
trailers may be used in most campgrounds. Campers should register 
at campground entrance in case of emergency calls. Please be quiet 
in camps from 10 p.m. unril 6 a.m. Camping space cannot be 
reserved. Note camp regulations on bulletin boards. Fallen wood 
(except sequoia) may be used for fuel. Do not drive nails inro trees 
or attach wires. The destruction, injury, defacement, removal, or 
disturbance of any .tree, vegetation, flower, fruir, rock, or wildlife is 
prohibited. Hunting and trapping or use of firearms is not permitted. 

FIRES. Kindle fires only in designated places. Campfire permits 
required, excepr in auto campgrounds. Extinguish fires completely 
before leaving, even for a short time. Please help prevent fires— be 
careful with matches and butning tobacco. Do not smoke while hiking. 

FISHING. A State of California* license— $5 for residents for year; 
$5 for nonresidenrs for 10 days— required. Fishing regulations are 
posted on bulletin boards.. 

ROADS. State Route 140 from Merced, State Route 41 from Fresno, 
and major vallay roads kept open all year, bur chains should be carried 
during winter. Tioga Road open only from lare June to October. Big 
Oak Flat Road (State Route 120) open from May to early November. 
Observe posted speed limits. 



ACCOMMODA TI0NS 

ALL YEAR 

Operated by Yosemite Park and Curry Co. 

Yosemite Lodge. — Hotel-type rooms, bungalows with bath, cabins 
without bath, housekeeping cabins. European plan. Cafeteria, grill. 
The Ahwahnee.— Hotel, cottages. American plan. Dining room. 
Stores.— Wawona, Yosemite Village. 

SUMMER 

Camp Curry.— Amman and European plans. Bungalows with bath, 
cabins without bath, tents. Dining room, cafeteria. Store, grill, bicycle 
stand. 

Housekeeping Camp Headquarters (formerly Camp 16, Yosemite 
Valley) and Stoneman Section Housekeeping. — Housekeeping tents. 

Glacier Point Hotel, — Rooms with Of without bath. European plan. 
Cafereria. 

Wawona Hotel. — American plan, dining room, swimming pool, golf 
course. 

Big Trees Lodge, — Rooms with or without bath. European plan. 
Cafereria. 

White Wolf Lodge, Tuolumne Meadows Lodge (on Tioga Road) and 

four High Sierra Camps.— Simple accommodations, meals. 

Stores. — Yosemite Village, Camp Curry, Camp 14, and Housekeeping 

Camp. Headquarters in Yosemite Valley; Wawona and Tuolumne 

Meadows. 

WINTER 

Badger Pass ski area on the Glacier Point Road, 20 miles ftom Yo- 
semite Valley. Ski lifts, rental equipment, ranger station, ski lodge, 
hot midday meals, but no lodging, from mid-December to April. Cross- 
country skiers must register with a ranger. 

Camp Curry. — Ice skating, mid-December ro mid-February. 

MOTOR TRIPS FROM YOSEMITE VALLEY 

(In winter, inquire as to road conditions) 

To Glacier Point. — 30 miles (about 114 hours) each way, a paved 
high-gear road, leaving the valley on State Route 41 near Bridalveil 
Fall. Panoramic view of the high Sierra and the valley. Hotel and 
campground. Naturalist activities during summer. Glacier Point 
Road closed from lare October until late April, except as far as Badger 
Pass ski area. 

To Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias. — 35 miles, paved highway, 
leaving Yosemite Valley at Bridalveil Fall on State Route 41. Giant 
sequoias, including the Grizzly Giant and Wawona (Tunnel) Ttee, 
may be seen here. Hotels, campgtounds, and naturalist activities at 
Wawona, summer only. Museum at Matiposa Gtove. During winret 
the road is usually open only to the Grizzly Gianr Tree. 

To Tuolumne Meadows and Tenaya I .tie. — 55 miles (about 2 y A 
hours) each way to the meadows, 48 miles to the lake, via Big Oak 
Flat Road to Crane Flat, then on Tioga Road. For 17 miles, Tioga 
Road is narrow, winding, and oiled, with sharp turns and long 
second-gear grades, but there are numerous turnouts for passing. 
Tioga Road not suitable for housetrailers, and only open during summer 
and early autumn. Lodge, campground, store, gas station, and naturalist 
activities in Tuolumne Meadows, summer only. 



BEARS AND DEER ARE DANGEROUS 

The feeding, touching, teasing, or molesring of bears or deer 
is prohibited by park regulations. They ate wild animals and 
may bite or strike you. Bears may break into camps or cars in 
search of food; it is best to suspend food supplies between two 
trees out of reach. Feeding human food ro deer may lead to 
their death. 



Please Help Protect Your Park. Keep it clean. — Deposit all trash, 
papers, garbage, and cans in receptacles provided. Don't he a Litterbug. 

Park rangers are here to help you, as well as to protect the park and 
enforce regulations. If you need information, or arc in any difficulty, 
see a park ranger. 



I 5 GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE tfSfl 0*— 100*40 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



Y-£\(eD 

Yosemite National Park 



4- juu^-i 



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#»M 



CALIFORNIA 



The National Park System, of which this park is a unit, is dedi- 
cated to conserving the scenic, scientific, and historic heritage of 
the United States tor the benefit and enjoyment of its people. 




UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Fred A. V mm, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Conrad L. Wifth, Director 




GENERAL FEATURES. Yosemite National Park comprises 1,189 
square miles of mountain scenery and wilderness— deep canyons, tow- 
ering granite cliffs, majestic forests, verdant meadows, rugged alpine 
peaks, more than 200 sparkling lakes, small glaciers, and a great 
variety of plant and animal life. The high mountain country beyond 
Yosemite Valley makes up most of the park, but is accessible only 
in summer and early autumn and largely by trail. Detailed informa- 
tion and larger maps available at the museum and park headquarters 
at Yosemite Village Visitor Center and at park ranger stations. 

YOSEMITE VALLEY. A magnificent gorge of particular charm 
because of its nearly vertical, high sculptured walls; broad, fiat floor; 
and lush meadows. The valley, at 4,000 feet elevation, is 7 miles long, 
about 1 mile wide, and 3,000 feet deep. It was cut by the combined 
action of the Merced River and the glaciers of the Ice Age. Visit the 
Yosemite Museum to learn this intetesting story. 

Scenic features in Yosemite Valley: El Capitan (largest single rock), 
Three Brothers, Cathedral Rocks, Cathedral Spires, Sentinel Rock, 
Glacier Point Cliff, Royal Arches, North Dome, Mirror Lake, Half 
Dome (highest cliff rising from valley), Happy Isles, and the water- 
falls. See map on reverse side for other points of interest, heights 
of cliffs and waterfalls, and roads and trails in vicinity of valley. 

WATERFALLS. Yosemite Falls plunges 2,425 feet, in 3 falls, from 
its brink to the valley floor. The Upper Yosemite Fall, second highest 
known free leap of water, drops 1,430 feet, equal to the height of 9 
Niagaras. Bridalveil Fall (620 feet) guards the western entrance ro 
the valley. Vernal Fall (317 feet) and Nevada Fall (594 feet) have 
the greatest volume of water and can be seen from Glacier Point or 
by short trail trip from the valley. The falls are spectacular from 
mid-March to mid-July when most of the snow melts in the high 
Sierra, but they reach their maximum flow in May and June. During 
the rest of the year they are small by comparison and are sometimes 
dry. 

MUSEUM AND NATURALIST ACTIVITIES. Exhibits in the 
museum at Yosemite Village will help you understand the plant and 
animal life, history, Indians, geology, and other natural features of the 
park. Park naturalists give daily talks on the valley formation and 
offer a variety of talks, guided trips, and campfire programs during 
the summer. Other exhibits of interest to both children and adults 
will be found at Happy Isles Nature Center, the meeting place for 
the Junior Ranger Program. Old buildings, wagons, and other ex- 
hibits at Wawona Pioneer Village tell the story of Yosemite's human 
history. 

HIKING. Obtain information about trails before hiking. Stay on 
designated trails; do not take shortcuts, or cut across zigzags— you 
might dislodge rocks that would injure others. On long hikes, start 
early, when it is cool, and get back before dark. Hikers going into 
isolated sections of the park should first register at a tangcr station. 

CAMPING. Ftee campgrounds in Yosemite Valley, at Glacier Point, 
Wawona, Tuolumne Meadows, and at several isolated spots. House- 
trailers may be used in most campgrounds. Campers should register 
at campground entrance in case of emergency calls. Please be quiet 
in camps from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m. Camping space cannot be 
reserved. Note camp regulations on bulletin boards. Fallen wood 
(except sequoia) may be used for fuel. Do not drive nails into trees 
or attach wires. The destruction, injury, defacement, removal, or 
disturbance of any .tree, vegetation, flower, fruit, tock, or wildlife is 
prohibited. Hunting and trapping or use of firearms is nor permitted. 

FIRES. Kindle fires only in designated places. Campfire permits 
required, except in auto campgrounds. Extinguish fires completely 
before leaving, even for a short time. Please help prevent fires— be 
careful with matches and burning tobacco. Do not smoke while hiking. 

FISHING. A State of California- license— $5 for residents for year; 
$5 for nonresidents for 10 days— required. Fishing regulations are 
posted on bulletin boards.. 

ROADS. State Route 140 from Merced, State Route 41 from Fresno, 
and major valloy roads kept open all year, but chains should be carried 
during winter. Tioga Road open only from late June to October. Big 
3ak Flat Road (State Route 120) open from May to early November. 
Observe posted speed limits. 

Reviled 1959 



A CCOM MOD A TIONS 

ALL YEAR 

Operated by Yosemite Park and Curry Co. 

Yosemite Lodge. — Horel-rype rooms, bungalows with bath, cabins 
without bath, housekeeping cabins. European plan. Cafeteria, grill. 
The Ahwahnee,— Hotel, cottages. American plan, Dining room. 
Stores.— Wawona, Yosemite Village. 

SUMMER 

Camp Curry.— American and European plans. Bungalows with bath, 
cabins without bath, tents. Dining room, cafeteria. Store, grill, bicycle 
stand. 

Housekeeping Camp Headquarters (formerly Camp 16, Yoscmire 
Valley) and Stoneman Section Housekeeping. — Housekeeping tents. 

Glacier Point Hotel. — Rooms with or without bath. European plan. 
Cafeteria. 

Wawona Hotel. — American plan, dining room, swimming pool, golf 
course. 

Big Trees Lodge. — Rooms with or without bath. European plan. 
Cafeteria. 

White Wolf Lodge, Tuolumne Meadows Lodge (on Tioga Road) and 
four High Sierra Camps.— Simple accommodations, meals. 
Stores.— Yoscmire Village, Camp Curry, Camp 14, and Housekeeping 
Camp. Headquarters in Yosemite Valley; Wawona and Tuolumne 
Meadows. 

WINTER 

Badger Pass ski area on the Glacier Point Road, 20 miles from Yo- 
semite Valley. Ski lifts, rental equipment, ranger station, ski lodge, 
hot midday meals, but no lodging, from mid-December to April. Cross- 
country skiers must register with a ranger. 

Camp Curry. — Ice skating, mid-December to mid-February. 

MOTOR TRIPS FROM YOSEMITE VALLEY 

(In winter, inquire as to road conditions) 

To Glacier Point. — 30 miles (about 1W hours) each way, a paved 
high-gear road, leaving the valley on State Route 41 near Bridalveil 
Fall. Panoramic view of the high Sierra and the valley. Hotel and 
campground. Naturalist activities during summer. Glacier Point 
Road closed from late October until late April, except as far as Badger 
Pass ski area. 

To Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias.— 35 miles, paved highway, 
leaving Yosemite Valley at Bridalveil Fall on State Route 41. Giant 
sequoias, including the Grizzly Giant and Wawona (Tunnel) Tree, 
may be seen here. Hotels, campgrounds, and naturalist activities at 
Wawona, summer only. Museum at Mariposa Grove. During winter 
the road is usually open only to the Grizzly Giant Ttee. 

To Tuolumne Meadows and Tenaya Lake.— 55 miles (about 2Vi 
hours) each way to the meadows, 48 miles to the lake, via Big Oak 
Flat Ro»d to Crane Flat, then on Tioga Road. For 17 miles, Tioga 
Road is narrow, winding, and oiled, with sharp turns and long 
second-gear grades, but there are numerous turnouts for passing. 
Tioga Road not suitable for housetrailers, and only open during summer 
and early autumn. Lodge, campground, store, gas station, and naturalist 
activities in Tuolumne Meadows, summer only. 



BEARS AND DEER ARE DANGEROUS 

The feeding, touching, teasing, or molesting of bears or deer 
is prohibited by park regulations. They are wild animals and 
may bite or strike you. Bears may break inro camps or cars in 
search of food; it is best to suspend food supplies between two 
trees out of teach. Feeding human food to deer may lead to 
thcit death. 



Please Help Protect Your Park. Keep it clean. — Deposit all trash, 
papers, garbage, and cans in receptacles provided. Don't be a Litterbug. 

Park rangers are here to help you, as well as to protect the park and 
enforce regulations. If you need information, or are in any difficulty, 
see a park ranger. 



f.ft GOVERNMENT PRINTIN6 OFFICE I l»S« OF-50OM0 



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